Laurentide ice sheet wisconsin dells

Wisconsin Glacial Stage, most recent major division of Pleistocene time and deposits in North America (from 2.6 million to 11,700 years ago). It was named for rock deposits studied in the state of Wisconsin. At least the last half, and possibly all, of the Wisconsin Stage corresponds to the Würm ...

Jul 11, 2017 · During the last Ice Age around 19,000 years ago (when Wisconsin was in its present-day location), the Green Bay lobe of the Laurentide ice sheet ponded meltwater and dammed the Wisconsin River to form Glacial Lake Wisconsin. At its greatest extent, this lake covered much of central Wisconsin and was the size of modern-day Great Salt Lake.

The southern Laurentide Ice Sheet David M. Mickelson1 and Patrick M. Colgan2 1 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin Madison, Weeks Hall, 1215 West Dayton Street, The evolution of Wisconsin’s landscape. Ceperley taught the Yahara Watershed Academy about The Laurentide Ice Sheet, which was a massive sheet of ice covering North America. The thickest part of the ice sheet was located over Hudson Bay. As it grew, it expanded radially outward, advancing under its own weight.

("Laurentide" is the name given to the ice sheet that advanced into Michigan from the Laurentian region of Canada.) This time period does not mark the maximum extent of the ice in the Great Lakes region (which occurred about 18,000 years ago), but it does show nicely the major lobes of ice that comprised the ice sheet. The southern Laurentide Ice Sheet David M. Mickelson1 and Patrick M. Colgan2 1 Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Wisconsin Madison, Weeks Hall, 1215 West Dayton Street,